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BFR - FlyNavy - 02-21-2019

Has anyone done a biannual flight review after being ot of the cockpit for a while? I went for my first flight in 25 years this weekend. My intent is to take a few flights and complete a BFR. Flew in a Robinson. MaxFlight told me that a minimum of 20 hours in model was required in the Robinson before a check ride could be done because of FAA requirements for that aircraft.

After reviewing some blogs, it looks like the FAA imposed this requirement after some safety issues.

I have an opportunity to fly in the Cabri G2 instead. They explained that it doesn't have the minimum limits. Or I could find someone with a Jet Ranger. I have 1100 hours in those.

Any input or suggestions?

Fly Navy,

Scott Langley
MCSE CEH CISSP

XET #1337 N334HY
Start: NOV 2018


RE: BFR - Dick Campbell - 02-21-2019

Hi Scott, you only need 10 hours dual in the R22, if you have more than 200 hours in helicopters. The 20 hours is for beginners. If your going to fly Robinson's read SFAR 73.

With your experience, I would look into any other helo. Do you have a a fixed wing license as well? If so, you could do your BFR in a Cessna or Piper (cheaper).


RE: BFR - FlyGuy - 02-21-2019

Scott,

I only have a fixed wing ticket. I took the required ground school and did my BFR in a c-172. That was the way to go for me.

Michael


RE: BFR - FlyNavy - 02-27-2019

Michael,
    I don't think I'd have the confidence to try it in a fixed wing.  I flew a Cessna in 1994 right after I quit flying helos and scared the crap out of myself.  Dick may remember this, but I kept expecting rudder pedal shakers (T-34C) to warn me that I was reaching stall limits.  I kept wanting to flare into a hover over the approach end.  And what was scarier was that the instructor was going to sign me off after 4 landings.


RE: BFR - Jacko - 02-28-2019

Scott,

I’ve never heard of anyone “failing” a BFR. It’s not a test. It’s two certified airmen meeting, talking, flying, sharing experience and learning together.

First, we spend an hour on the ground reviewing any FARs that are new and/or particularly relevant to my kind of flying (an N-reg bushplane in Europe). Maybe talk about new pre- and in-flight weather tools, flight planning and decision making.

Then we go and have fun. Engine failure on take-off, autopilot malfunction, an electrical fire drill, glider tow release failure, whatever. We do “HASELL” checks and see who can achieve the lowest GPS ground speed before the old bird quits flying. We have a little private STOL competition or maybe go and wash the bushwheels with some water landings. Then we de-brief, what was good and what was less so. But there’s no pass or fail. It’s a couple of hours with an instructor from which I always learn something...


RE: BFR - FlyNavy - 03-03-2019

(02-28-2019, 12:25 AM)Jacko Wrote: Scott,

I’ve never heard of anyone “failing” a BFR. It’s not a test. It’s two certified airmen meeting, talking, flying, sharing experience and learning together.

First, we spend an hour on the ground reviewing any FARs that are new and/or particularly relevant to my kind of flying (an N-reg bushplane in Europe). Maybe talk about new pre- and in-flight weather tools, flight planning and decision making.

Then we go and have fun. Engine failure on take-off, autopilot malfunction, an electrical fire drill, glider tow release failure, whatever. We do “HASELL” checks and see who can achieve the lowest GPS ground speed before the old bird quits flying. We have a little private STOL competition or maybe go and wash the bushwheels with some water landings. Then we de-brief, what was good and what was less so. But there’s no pass or fail. It’s a couple of hours with an instructor from which I always learn something...
Jacko,
    Thanks.   I may be thinking of this too much like an annual Navy NATOPS check.   I'll try 1 or 2 more flights to be comfortable again and then do the BFR.
And I already did the 1 hour ground portion by doing the Rusty Pilot seminar with AOPA.


RE: BFR - Raymo - 03-08-2019

Scott is correct on the no-fail part, I just did my BFR last month. The instructor is required to provide one hour of ground and one flying, minimum, but some are more flexible than others.