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wind sheer - Printable Version

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wind sheer - walter david - 03-23-2006

Question; How does this copter handle in high winds. should i seek protected area and tie down.
How much wind will it take? What kind of gas does it take? Can this be taken appart quickly so that
i can haul it on a trailer?


RE: wind sheer - mosquito - 03-24-2006

The wind tolerance of the Mosquito is largely up to the pilot. The Mosquito is easier to hover than the R22 and is approximately the same as the Hughes 300. I fly in winds up to 30 mph with no problems.
Fuel is premium auto gas or 100 LL. To haul on a trailer you can either support the blades or remove them. Removing them is done by removing 4 bolts and takes about 5 to 10 minutes. You should either strap the tail rotor in place or remove it. The tail rotor comes off with 5 smaller bolts.


RE: wind sheer - Army Guy - 01-15-2007

I had a question about the rotor blades. When transporting the Mosquito on a trailer, I was thinking I might have to remove the rotor blades before I travel as I didn't want to damage the rotor system in any way. I've heard that the Rotorway had a few challenges (it seems like, one of the many) the rotor system had parts that "banged into each other" and this compromised the integrity of the system. Until I saw this quote "............To haul on a trailer you can either support the blades or remove them. Removing them is done by removing 4 bolts and takes about 5 to 10 minutes. You should either strap the tail rotor in place or remove it. The tail rotor comes off with 5 smaller bolts." Is this a possible problem with the Mosquito? Smile


RE: wind sheer - mosquito - 01-16-2007

Don't fully understand your question, however, I think our recommendations would be the same for any helicopter that is to be ground transported. The blades must either be held in place during transport or removed. In normal operation they depend on centrifugal force to keep them rigid and on aerodynamic forces to keep them in position. In the absence of those forces they are free to teeter so during ground transport will rock back and forth and contact the teeter stops, damaging them if the forces are high enough. They are fairly easy to remove and so for long trips that is a good plan. You can leave them on as well but they must be well supported.


RE: wind sheer - Army Guy - 01-16-2007

Thanks for the reply. Sorry the question was a little confusing, but you answered my question. Smile Smile