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New Mosquito Guy Questions
#41
tcurl - 8/12/2010 10:05 AM
I more or less agree with all of your comment tyc, except for the "secretive" part. I have found John Uptigrove quite open about what he is doing and how he is going about accomplishing it.
The "problem" is perhaps that John does not announce new ideas prematurely
... I do not believe there has been an accident of which I'm aware, to date, that has not been attributable to pilot error or unauthorized design modification.

About that "secretive" part, as I understand it he never got the letter, so I'll be resending it. There are some simple, straight forward questions, which if anything may give him something to think about and no, there's no "evil intent" in that regard. I've been involved with civil aviation, specifically helicopters, Brantly, Bells and to a lesser extent the Hughes and Enstroms (no R22s), since the late sixties and while I've not "seen it all" I've seen enough to know enough to sit back and have a good, long, hard look and above all, to ask questions; the plight of those mini-500 owners comes to mind right off the bat.

As for accidents, the pattern which appears to be forming is that there are few, very few. From what I've been able to find so far, with few exceptions the owner/operators are from the view of a given mind set, a rather conservative lot. Which to me is a good thing; The aviation community does not need "cowboys.". I'm not too sure just how many of the AIRs have been sold, let alone assembled and at least test flown, nor for that matter the XE class but as of this date and to the best of my knowledge there have been just two fatalities with these Mosquitos and both were XELs. Why just the XELs? At this point I suspect it's just way "too early in the game" to make any reasonable infrences in that regard. Compare this with the Scorpions and the like. One fellow here suggest that the FAA isn't all that interested in these "kits" and the related accidents but I can and so suggest, they're interested. Perhaps not as much at this time as with the mass-produced units such as the Hughes/McDonalds or Bells, which currently exist in far greater numbers.

While a good number of indidivuals may see these as Mosquitos as "toys", I'm sure at this point in time others like me have a slightly different view; small business owners going quickly from point A to point B in a normal course of events in their trade, sportsmen, hunters and fishermen going up to their favorite lodge or campgrounds, to science and police applications. I suspect you'll agree with me when you think about it, that fellow Uptigrove may have something more here than even he and his close associates may realize at this point.

Just my two cents anyway.

tyc







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#42
Hey Brian, gutsy Youtube larry here,

Wow, you have 100 hours in a Mini? BTW: N25JT is a 1965 Hawker Siddeley DH.125-1A in Ca. I was in a Hawker 1000 once and wasn't scared.
I have a Mini-500 in my car port.
Bought it on eBay $10k, no engine, 250hrs, several years ago, before buying the Mosquito.
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#43
I thinkJack Ogle (Owner of N25JT) MAY HVE DEREGISTERED IT WHEN HE SOLD IT TO ROY MOON.
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#44
Pfranc - 8/14/2010 3:05 PM

Hey Brian, gutsy Youtube larry here,

Wow, you have 100 hours in a Mini? BTW: N25JT is a 1965 Hawker Siddeley DH.125-1A in Ca. I was in a Hawker 1000 once and wasn't scared.
I have a Mini-500 in my car port.
Bought it on eBay $10k, no engine, 250hrs, several years ago, before buying the Mosquito.

Ah Ha!! Larry IS rich!!
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#45
Hi Bryan,
Ive tried looking for your FaceBook page, ...... So many Bryan Cobb's. I Think I found you!

Ive sent a friend request, Im the Australasian Dealer for the Mosquito and I have a bunch of photo's on my FB pages.

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#46
Blair,
I accepted your request! Make sure you check out my videos of landing the Mini-500 at gas stations and restaurants.


Bryan
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#47
bryancobb - 8/15/2010 2:57 PM
... landing the Mini-500 at gas stations and restaurants.

Can't think of his name at the moment but there is a fellow, from Texas, who owns an early AIR and who developed a simple rig to carry not one but two five (5) gallon gasoline containers under the seat of the AIR. Again, it's an AIR not a XE.

Landing "at gas stations" along a given route to fill up one of those empty containers (which would already have the proper oil volume in it, ready for filling with high octaine gasoline), when considering the shorter range of the AIR as opposed to the XE, this was one of the first things to cross my mind when I initially came across the Mosquito machines.

With regard to the AIR and landing "at gas stations", at this point there is little doubt here but that if you are familiar with the territory below (at least gas station wise) for a given area and all else equal, one could considerably extend the fllight range of an AIR. How well a varient of this extendng the range process would work with an XE is currently an unknown here - but at present an AIR, along with its hourly operation costs should prove considerably superior to a Brantly B2 series machine, let alone a Hughes 300 or for that matter, an R22 ... something to think about.

tyc
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#48
I SWEAR THIS IS THE TRUTH!!
I went on a long cross country in a Tierra II ultralight once. ( never again ) I think my groundspeed was about 45 MPH!!
I carried a full 6.5 gallon plastic fuel container in the cockpit sitting over to the side behind the seat, in addition to the 12 gallon tank that was installed in the aircraft.
After there was room in the tank, I unfastened my seat belt and turned around on my knees in the seat.
I poured the 6.5 gallons into the tank while in level flight. We had put an electric trim on the Tierra, made from a 12v drill.
That allowed me to retrim the plane after I turned around onto my knees.

IF I'M LYING...I'M DYING!!!
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#49
I'm not sure I would have admitted to anything like that.

bryancobb - 8/15/2010 11:40 AM

I SWEAR THIS IS THE TRUTH!!
I went on a long cross country in a Tierra II ultralight once. ( never again ) I think my groundspeed was about 45 MPH!!
I carried a full 6.5 gallon plastic fuel container in the cockpit sitting over to the side behind the seat, in addition to the 12 gallon tank that was installed in the aircraft.
After there was room in the tank, I unfastened my seat belt and turned around on my knees in the seat.
I poured the 6.5 gallons into the tank while in level flight. We had put an electric trim on the Tierra, made from a 12v drill.
That allowed me to retrim the plane after I turned around onto my knees.

IF I'M LYING...I'M DYING!!!
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#50
I would bet my life that anyone wanting to beat me up for doing that has done something just as dumb!
I was a lot younger and thought I could do anything I wanted to with NO consequences. I was flying a 500# "ultralight'
under Part 103!! Everybody was doing crazy stuff! Flying on top, descending through clouds, etc.
We were lucky kids and I don't remember anyone ever getting hurt. A friend name ?eil ?aunce got too low over the lake 1 day
and caught a tire. He cartwheeled and sank in 10' water. He got out safely. A boat pulled him to shore. He emptied the fuel tank, got gas from the marina,
cut holes in each rib bay to drain the water, and flew home!

KNOCK ON WOOD (I DON'T BELIEVE IN JINX's) I HAVE BEEN A LICENSED PILOT SINCE 1985. I HAVE NEVER SO MUCH AS SCRATCHED ANY AIRCRAFT I WAS PILOTING.
I HAVE NEVER BEEN VIOLATED BY THE FAA. I HAVE NEVER FLUNKED A CHECKRIDE (EITHER MILITARY OR CIVILIAN) AND I HAVE NEVER GOT CAUGHT IN A
THUNDERSTORM.

I may have done some dumb stuff when I was younger, but in addition to luck, I think I'm still alive partly because I am a competent pilot.
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