Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
"Annual inspection" on experimental
#1
Hi
As a builder, you may qualify, after a 16 hour course with EAA, to do your own 'annual inspection' (AI) on your aircraft only.

What happens to the next owner of that aircraft for the annual?
Regular maintenance may be done by the owner on the experimental
heli as I understand it. I believe (please correct me if I am wrong) that the original builder may continue to do the AI either by kind favor, or as part
of the the purchase agreement.

How hard is it to convince a regular engineer to do the AI on an 'experimental? I imagine that they have litigation fears.

also what would be a reasonable estimate for someone to do that AI? Assuming the heli is in good shape.

How do I find a willing engineer for the AI? Is EAA a good place to advertise for my local region?

Looking forward to tying up a few lose ends in my head before placing an order.

THanks
Stuart
Reply
#2
Several corrections.

1) If you have built the aircraft, you can apply for a Repairman's Certificate. There is no class required that I know about. I didn't take one when I finished my airplane. It is simply an application and pretty easy to get.

2) For Experimental's the annual is called a, "Condition Inspection." I know it is a technicality but that is the way it is.

3) If you don't have the Repairman's Certificate an A&P must do the inspection. It doesn't have to be an AI.

4) Shouldn't be too difficult to get an A&P to give you a hand. If you establish a relationship with one, you can do most of the work under their guidance saving you time and money.

The Condition Inspection on a Mosquito shouldn't take but a few hours. Go for the Repairman's Certificate if you built the AC. Nobody will know it better than you.

Darwin N. Barrie
Chandler, AZ
XET on order
Reply
#3
The 16 hour course is for Light-Sport aircraft only.  Rotorcraft do not qualify for Light-Sport.

Read Advisory Circular 65-23.  Only the original builder may be issued a Repairman Certificate.  Only the holder of the Repairman Certificate, FAA certified A&P or an appropriately rated FAA repair station may perform the annual "condition inspection".

When the aircraft is sold, the repairman can either surrender the repairman certificate or retain the certificate in order to perform condition inspections on the aircraft for the new owner.  That arrangement is made by the repairman and new owner.

I can't answer your questions about hiring an A&P/Repair Station as I have no experience with that.

The FAA does not require an "Annual Inspection" for amateur built aircraft.  When you apply for the airworthiness certificate, the certificating inspector will issue operating limits.  Those limits usually require a condition inspection every 12 months.
Reply
#4
Stules - 8/22/2010 6:15 PM

Hi
As a builder, you may qualify, after a 16 hour course with EAA, to do your own 'annual inspection' (AI) on your aircraft only.

What happens to the next owner of that aircraft for the annual?
Regular maintenance may be done by the owner on the experimental
heli as I understand it. I believe (please correct me if I am wrong) that the original builder may continue to do the AI either by kind favor, or as part
of the the purchase agreement.

How hard is it to convince a regular engineer to do the AI on an 'experimental? I imagine that they have litigation fears.

also what would be a reasonable estimate for someone to do that AI? Assuming the heli is in good shape.

How do I find a willing engineer for the AI? Is EAA a good place to advertise for my local region?

Looking forward to tying up a few lose ends in my head before placing an order.

THanks
Stuart

Stuart,
I'll assume that you are somewhere that US FAR's apply. I do not know about anywhere else.

1) Don't mix LSA regs into the mix. Only LSA's have a provision for an owner to attend a COURSE that allows them to do maintenance on an aircraft and THERE ARE NO HELICOPTERS INCLUDED IN ANY LSA REGS.

(AI) DOES NOT stand for anual inspection. AI means an A&P mechanic with an INSPECTION AUTHORIZATION.

* An AI can Sign-Off an annual inspection on ANY aircraft, Certified, Experimental EAB, or LSA.
* An A&P can only Sign-Off an annual Condition on an Experimental Amateur-Built EAB.
* ANYONE can WORK-ON and make entries in the logbooks of an EAB. Just cannot sign off the annual condition inspection.
An ENGINEER is not an aviation related term. Here's the terms for people who turn wrenches and make logbook entries on aircraft: OWNER, REPAIRMAN, A&P MECHANIC, AI.

2) Any Mosquito other than AIR's and XEL's Falls under EXPERIMENTAL AMATEUR-BUILT regs.

3) EAB regs allow THE ORIGINAL BUILDER to very easily apply for a REPAIRMAN certificate (on that ship only) after the Airworthiness Certificate is issued.

4) Anyone can legally do maintenance on an EAB. Either the REPAIRMAN (from #3) or any licenced A&P mechanic or AI can sign off the Condition Inspection (ANNUAL) on an EAB

5) The services of an ENGINEER is never needed pertaining to an Annual Condition Inspection on an EAB.

6) My experience has been that an A&P mechanic will typically charge $100 to $150 to put his name in the Aircraft Logs as the person responsible for completing the Condition Inspection.

7) Most A&P's will want to be familiarized (by you) with all the systems and features of the Mosquito, before they are willing to get involved. They will want you to show them all the things YOU have done to it so they can asess wheither you have any business working on a helicopter. If he feels you are pretty sharp, you have a needed friend.

8) The BEST OF ALL WORLDS ANSWER IS... build it yourself, get the repairman certificate, and do ALL of your own work and paperwork.

9) Most EAB builders, when they sell their aircraft, don't want to be involved with it any more. They may help you with getting your first Condition Inspection after your purchase, and they may help in getting YOUR A&P up to speed, but after that they want very limited involvement. I'm sure NOT ALL of them fit this description, but this has been my experience.

When I owned my Brantly Certified Helicopter, I established a strong degree of trust between me and my AI. He supervised and inspected all of my work. He learned to have confidence in what I did even though I was not an A&P. I gave him a thorough education on Brantly systems and even took him flying in it. This was valuable to me and saved me a fortune. Annuals were always less than $250.

If you are not the original builder of your Mosquito, or if you are not an A&P, establishing this line of trust between you and a willing A&P mechanic is a must or you will be hard-pressed to get your yearly condition inspectons completed.
Reply
#5
The IA is an 'inspection authorization' which is added to the A&P.  It allows the A&P to do annual inspections and several other things.
Reply
#6
bryancobb - 8/22/2010 12:50 AM
 3) EAB regs allow THE ORIGINAL BUILDER to very easily apply for a REPAIRMAN certificate (on that ship only) after the Airworthiness Certificate is issued.


Minor correction: E/AB regs allow the PRIMARY builder to apply for the Repairman certificate.  You don't have to be the first (you might have bought an unfinished kit from the guy who bought an unfinished kit from the original owner) but you do have to document and demonstrate to the Examiner that you are sufficiently familiar with the construction of the craft to certify that it is airworthy.
-Chip-
N8421L Mosquito XE-285
Reply
#7
I was using Original and Primary to mean the same thing but you are right. I may have misled someone so thanks for correcting it.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)