Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
A Mile High
#1
XE 285  1205 (Myrtle)
Start: 8/1/2013
Finish: 5/24/2014
Arrived home: 10/11/2014

Reply
#2
Now that I have Myrtle home with me, it was time to complete my fixed wing biannual flight review. Prior to starting the engine the instructor told me about the mixture setting needing to be leaned to keep from fouling the plugs (first awakening). When we were cleared for take off my first surprise was how sluggish the throttle response was (second awakening). Yesterday I had my first helicopter instruction at altitude. Trust me these bird are very different up here! The name of the game here is power management. I shot some autos and there is not a real glide up here, they drop here (third awakening)!

There is a lot of learning ahead. Just because I have a copter does not mean I will jump in and fly away. Owning this machine adds another level of responsibility to my life. So I see more instruction in my future and I am glad winter is coming so I will have "thicker" air to rely on for a while. This is a different animal.

Michael
XE 285  1205 (Myrtle)
Start: 8/1/2013
Finish: 5/24/2014
Arrived home: 10/11/2014

Reply
#3
I started flying in R22's, decent glide range. When I first auto'ed a 300 I started my count down with the runway where I was used to seeing it in the 22. I was immediately corrected by the instructor. He told me the way to determine the glide path in the 300 is toss out a brick and follow it down! Completely different animal from the Robbie. Can't imagine any auto being more straight down then those but sounds like they would be there!

Have you flown either the 22 or the 300? I'm curious how the mosquito compares to the ships I'm used to, especially doing the autos.
Reply
#4
Helireed,

I took an hour of instruction here in Colorado in a 300ci and when when I started the auto it just fell! Also took some instruction in Florida in a 300cbi and there was a glide. I chalk it up to high altitude. I have not had my bird higher than 15' since I have had it home. I thought I should take it slow and make sure everything is 100% and that I too am fully capable of performing solo autos.

Before the Mosquito I was a hang glider pilot and I took things slow then too. I have been working out the bugs from the initial build and will be taking more instruction in the next month. After that I intend to take my 285 up to flying altitude (300 feet) and find out how it autos at a mile high. Sorry I can't give you more information at this time, but stay tuned.

Michael
XE 285  1205 (Myrtle)
Start: 8/1/2013
Finish: 5/24/2014
Arrived home: 10/11/2014

Reply
#5
Michael,

Even 15' sounds like a blast. I wish everyone shared your philosophy of taking it slow with both man and machine! It would change a lot of the bad press GA flying gets. I look forward to hearing how she handles once all is ready.

Just curious, is your 285 factory built, or was it a factory assist?
Reply
#6
Helireed,

I got my fixed-wing ticket in 1977 and the FAA Examiner along with my instructors told me never to get in a hurry. I have taken their advice throughout all of my flying life and it has served me well, especially with hang gliding. I get a big kick just pulling my bird into a hover. Have been working on hovering autos, pirouettes, and all the other basics. I want to make sure when I take her up that all I have to think about is flying and not any mechanical issues.

My build was factory assist and I would recommend it to everyone. They will not allow you to press a bearing in backwards or make an expensive mistake. Building an experimental helicopter has many critical steps. They have a jig for just about everything at the factory so much of the guess work is eliminated. If you have a question there is someone to answer it and explain the reasoning why something should be done in a certain way. And at the end of the build you have Dwight who has more Mosquito time than anyone except John Uptigrove to test fly and put it through it's paces. That ads a lot of confidence to the build. For me build assist was the only way to go!

Michael
XE 285  1205 (Myrtle)
Start: 8/1/2013
Finish: 5/24/2014
Arrived home: 10/11/2014

Reply
#7
helireed - 3/11/2015 7:19 PM

I started flying in R22's, decent glide range. When I first auto'ed a 300 I started my count down with the runway where I was used to seeing it in the 22. I was immediately corrected by the instructor. He told me the way to determine the glide path in the 300 is toss out a brick and follow it down! Completely different animal from the Robbie. Can't imagine any auto being more straight down then those but sounds like they would be there!

Have you flown either the 22 or the 300? I'm curious how the mosquito compares to the ships I'm used to, especially doing the autos.

The H300 has a very steep auto-glide, it is true. But when you get to the flare, the 300 is much better. You have much more collective available for last minute corrections. I had a student who (inadvertently) put us into a downwind position just before the flare. In an R22, that would have caused damage. But in the 300, there was plenty of stored energy available - and those grossly and obscenely overpriced oleos soaked up anything left over.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)