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Would you like to see a two seater Mosquito?
#31
I really like the Mosquito bi-place but here in Italy or you have a private helicopter pilot license (very costly to maintain for a minimum quantity of flight hours in a year on helicopters certificates) or the maximum take-off weight must not exceed 450 kg (995 Pounds), which is very difficult to obtain for a two-seater.
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#32
John, You are making the right decision by having side by side seating. One of the first tasks that people will put it to, will be flight training.
I have trained pilots in the R22 and the Drifter (an Australian ultralight aeroplane with tandem seating). The R22 with it's side by side seating enables the instructor to "read" the student much more clearly than in the Drifter. Not only white knuckles but twisted lips and even happy smiles are clear to the teacher!
In a trainer, the side by side arrangement wins every time.
Rob
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#33
Any preliminary ideas/goals regarding what you are shooting for in useful load, range, single pilot seat weight, etc?

Am I correct that there are only 4 other 2 or more place kit helis out there? the "baby Belle, Rotorway, and the Humingbird (4 seats, but almost 200K to build Sad )?
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#34
Good Afternoon...

I am all for a two seater! The design of the Mosquito is solid and I would expect the same from John in a two seater. I rent an R22 now and really want to own my own helicopter.

My choices are single seaters; Mosquito and Helicycle, maybe the ultrasport and the Mini 500: the two seaters; Safari, CH-7, Rotorway, Dynali, Pawnee and someday maybe the Wasp and a couple others: and a four seater, the Hummingbird. Prices run from $30,000 ish to $190,000 ish. Designs are smooth runners like the Mosquito and shakers like the Safari (although the retro look of the machine and glass area of the Safari makes it a contender, but the price has become too high.). Some of our choices are IMHO too dangerous (Rotorway and Mini), and unproven (Dynali and Pawnee).
A new, fresh design from John that still gives us a high inertia MR, the modern look and speed of the Mosquito, a shaft to the TR (no long belts, thanks!) and the composite construction at a fair price has me delaying making my purchase until we see more of what he has in mind. He hints at using a Lycoming, thats seems like a great choice, although I would consider his Helo even if John decided to use a Subaru as it has a lot of flight hours in the gyros.

See you at Oshkosh!

Tom
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#35
Anyone have any updates on the development of a two seater?
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#36
J U, any updates. i am going to design and build a 4 seater in the next two to three years.i may start with a single seat and then move to a two then four. after teaching many many kids here to fly in the army, i have come up with so many ideas to make them safe and redundant while being lite weight. if you are interested in some ideas, let me know. i look foward to the fly in in trenton.
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#37
I would always support the idea of a true aircraft engine like the Lycoming family.
Subarus etc are perhaps ok as a one -off experimental type, but the manufacturer will have zero interest in providing aircraft engines on a factory to factory basis.
Van Grunsven, he of RV4, 6 etc would say "can I persuade you to use a PROPER aircraft engine?"
He would go on to say that reliability against eventual, true cost, Lycoming RR etc have the runs on the board. In spadefuls.
Rob Hall
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#38
this mutil place helicopter idea is by far the most interesting of all. i say give it a go. i would encourage you to use two engines due to the fact that you need redundancy when carrying multiple people. you can use the MZ engines side by side. i have a great "torque matching, load shareing" idea for this as well as a governor/correlator. the other engine on here is not to allow hovering single engine. it will only be to fly to where you need to to run on land. you shold also tie your tail rotor to yourverticle fin, makeing it a rudder. this way you can off load the tail rotor at low speeds and if you evr lost tail rotor in flight, just add a little more tail rotor. you should alsobuil a mechanical mixing unit on there. this will relieve alot of brain processes that go on while trying to minipulate you yaw and roll relative to your collective movements. i wouldnt attach my name to an aircraft that has a hi probability of single part failure while someone who doesnt practice emergency procedures at least once a week. your halicopter must have wheels. this will give it the ability to say out of the height avoid curve. so it will decrease your exposure time to dangerouse situations. that mean land and take off verticly when you need to and rolling take off and roll on land when you can. this will give the pilot more weight to take off if they have a high gross weight. that way i, being a big guy, can have another big guy on board and do a rolling takeoff and not have to worry about weight. we would burn off fuel befor we land makeing us lighter to hover down or just do another roll on landing. when i used to race go karts, we had 4 wheel disc brakes. you should look at adapting these. they are lite and set up to go fast. if you wanted to keep it skids mostly, then put a lever to raise and lower wheels in the air. this would be real easy to fabricate. these are just a few of my ideas to make a helicopter safer. it is ideas that i am going to incorperate in my four seater one day.
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#39
garyd - 11/30/2007 8:08 PM

Unsure how to answer that. With all the great 2 seaters already out there, i,e. Rotorway, R22, Sweitzer's 269 and 300C, Hughes, Bell 47, Hiller, Safari, just to mention a few, how would you change the design to entice rotorhead lovers?
If I remember correctly they're all over $100k. Have a ready built 2 seater for around $70-80k (double the mosquito) and a good design and I think it will sell!

P.S. Might be good if you offer tandem to offer a model for one LARGE pilot with single seat and controls instead of 2 in the tandem airframe. Us big guys have dreams too.
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#40
I'm hard at it. Plugging our way there. No promises of completion dates but its becoming a higher priority all the time. If all goes as planned I think you'll like what you see.
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