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Looking for some Mosquito acquisition advice
#11
(07-01-2018, 01:45 PM)Dick Campbell Wrote: Ah, you've started down the slippery slope - congrats!.  What is the name of the flight school?

Well the company is called Salaika Aviation down in beautiful Danbury TX where they have a nice private facility, 100LL on site, they are an FAA authorized repair center, and even have an FAA authorized helicopter simulator on site as well.

The aircraft we flew was a bit older model, I didn't think to ask what year but I would bet late 70's early 80's if I had to guess, I was at first a little worried at how dinged up and old the aircraft looked, but TJ was very diligent in his preflight and walked me through his checklist showing me what we were looking at and what we should expect to see, but the aircraft sounded and flew amazingly, at least  to my untrained senses haha

Now I just don't know if I should tell them about my desire to fly home-built experimentals after my training is complete, I hear there can be serious disdain towards non-certified aircraft in the GA world and I certainly don't want to skew my instructors impressions of me any which way...anyone have any advice about this?
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#12
Hi Casey, I've been following your thread and I thought I'd chime in.

I looked at their website and based on the following statement, "No home-built, experimental, or Robinson (R-22) helicopters are used.", I can see why you might be concerned about telling them.

Having said that, I still don't think you should worry about what your instructor might think. Did they ask you upfront what your intentions are? My instructor asked me and I did not hesitate to tell him I wanted to get my PPL because I have an experimental helicopter. In my experience so far, most of the instructors and fellow students I have told have been very positive about it. Most, if not all, even know what a mosquito is and think it's cool.

It's your money so if for whatever reason your instructor treats you differently, then you can always find another instructor to train with. Helicopter flight training is too expensive to train with someone that you're not comfortable with and/or confident in their teaching abilities.

Steve
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#13
I saw that comment as well on their web site, and I think they take it to mean that the R22 has a reputation as being difficult to fly, and also SFAR 73, so they don't scare away prospective students. I have heard said that if you can fly the R22, you can fly any helicopter. I'm about to find out, because all my rotor time is in the R22. And any informed person would know that flight training in an experimental is illegal.

Now, if they show an outright prejudice against any pilot, that's very unprofessional and I would find another school.
XE285 #1329 N869DJ
Start: June 2018
Done:  Sep 12, 2018  Sleepy 
AWC Issued: Sep 26, 2018  Big Grin  
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#14
(07-02-2018, 04:37 PM)Motoman Wrote: Hi Casey, I've been following your thread and I thought I'd chime in.

I looked at their website and based on the following statement, "No home-built, experimental, or Robinson (R-22) helicopters are used.", I can see why you might be concerned about telling them.

Having said that, I still don't think you should worry about what your instructor might think. Did they ask you upfront what your intentions are? My instructor asked me and I did not hesitate to tell him I wanted to get my PPL because I have an experimental helicopter. In my experience so far, most of the instructors and fellow students I have told have been very positive about it. Most, if not all, even know what a mosquito is and think it's cool.

It's your money so if for whatever reason your instructor treats you differently, then you can always find another instructor to train with. Helicopter flight training is too expensive to train with someone that you're not comfortable with and/or confident in their teaching abilities.

Steve

Hi Steve! Yeah my instructor had asked what my intentions were as far as a private rating or commercial or more, so I simply answered I'm training mostly for recreation but maybe one day I'd be interested in transitioning to commercial but for the most part I just want to learn to fly helicopters for my own enjoyment which was all 100% true so I shouldn't feel dishonest or anything haha

And while you are absolutely correct, it is my money and if there is something about me anyone doesn't like, thankfully this is America and I'm completely free to take my money elsewhere. However, on the flip side of that token, it has been a very difficult ordeal finding helicopter instruction in my area, and even more difficult finding instruction in an aircraft other than an R-22 which no one will train me in anyway being so close to the max seat weight. I was able to find this company and another which uses the Cabri Guibal G2(not sure if they would train me in  either) but they never even called me back lol

So in short, yes I could absolutely find somewhere else, but since this place is such a good match for me I want to try make it work. Perhaps I'll keep my mouth shut for a few lessons and when I know everyone better I'll try the age old: "hey I was looking online last night at This Mosquito thing, what are your thoughts on experimentals?" lol then my instructor will end up here on the forums and see my post and the proverbial cat is out of the proverbial bag lolol

(07-02-2018, 05:28 PM)Dick Campbell Wrote: I saw that comment as well on their web site, and I think they take it to mean that the R22 has a reputation as being difficult to fly, and also SFAR 73, so they don't scare away prospective students.  I have heard said that if you can fly the R22, you can fly any helicopter.  I'm about to find out, because all my rotor time is in the R22.  And any informed person would know that flight training in an experimental is illegal.

Now, if they show an outright prejudice against any pilot, that's very unprofessional and I would find another school.

You say that flight training in an experimental is illegal, but if I'm not mistaken it's only illegal to rent an experimental out for training purposes, however if I owned a Rotorway 2 seater, a CFI could still teach me in it, he just can't own it and rent it to me for training. There's a service in alabama I believe where you can purchase a used 162f from them, then they train you up in it, and then you can sell it back to them or keep it
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#15
(07-02-2018, 05:35 PM)Casey Wrote:
(07-02-2018, 04:37 PM)Motoman Wrote: Hi Casey, I've been following your thread and I thought I'd chime in.

I looked at their website and based on the following statement, "No home-built, experimental, or Robinson (R-22) helicopters are used.", I can see why you might be concerned about telling them.

Having said that, I still don't think you should worry about what your instructor might think. Did they ask you upfront what your intentions are? My instructor asked me and I did not hesitate to tell him I wanted to get my PPL because I have an experimental helicopter. In my experience so far, most of the instructors and fellow students I have told have been very positive about it. Most, if not all, even know what a mosquito is and think it's cool.

It's your money so if for whatever reason your instructor treats you differently, then you can always find another instructor to train with. Helicopter flight training is too expensive to train with someone that you're not comfortable with and/or confident in their teaching abilities.

Steve

Hi Steve! Yeah my instructor had asked what my intentions were as far as a private rating or commercial or more, so I simply answered I'm training mostly for recreation but maybe one day I'd be interested in transitioning to commercial but for the most part I just want to learn to fly helicopters for my own enjoyment which was all 100% true so I shouldn't feel dishonest or anything haha

And while you are absolutely correct, it is my money and if there is something about me anyone doesn't like, thankfully this is America and I'm completely free to take my money elsewhere. However, on the flip side of that token, it has been a very difficult ordeal finding helicopter instruction in my area, and even more difficult finding instruction in an aircraft other than an R-22 which no one will train me in anyway being so close to the max seat weight. I was able to find this company and another which uses the Cabri Guibal G2(not sure if they would train me in  either) but they never even called me back lol

So in short, yes I could absolutely find somewhere else, but since this place is such a good match for me I want to try make it work. Perhaps I'll keep my mouth shut for a few lessons and when I know everyone better I'll try the age old: "hey I was looking online last night at This Mosquito thing, what are your thoughts on experimentals?" lol then my instructor will end up here on the forums and see my post and the proverbial cat is out of the proverbial bag lolol

(07-02-2018, 05:28 PM)Dick Campbell Wrote: I saw that comment as well on their web site, and I think they take it to mean that the R22 has a reputation as being difficult to fly, and also SFAR 73, so they don't scare away prospective students.  I have heard said that if you can fly the R22, you can fly any helicopter.  I'm about to find out, because all my rotor time is in the R22.  And any informed person would know that flight training in an experimental is illegal.

Now, if they show an outright prejudice against any pilot, that's very unprofessional and I would find another school.

You say that flight training in an experimental is illegal, but if I'm not mistaken it's only illegal to rent an experimental out for training purposes, however if I owned a Rotorway 2 seater, a CFI could still teach me in it, he just can't own it and rent it to me for training. There's a service in alabama I believe where you can purchase a used 162f from them, then they train you up in it, and then you can sell it back to them or keep it
Yes, sorry I wasn't more specific.  You can receive flight training in your aircraft, but in general, experimentals cannot be used for commercial purposes.

R22 max seat weight is 240 lbs.  You might check out Veracity Aviation at Pearland.
XE285 #1329 N869DJ
Start: June 2018
Done:  Sep 12, 2018  Sleepy 
AWC Issued: Sep 26, 2018  Big Grin  
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#16
I gotcha! Sorry, I didn't mean to be a Nancy Nitpicker lol, it's just that after a talk with Dwight I was informed that a simple solo endorsement doesn't technically allow me to fly an XE285 and that I would need a full PPL-H to be legal or an instructor willing to give me a solo sign off in the Mosquito...soooo I'm at that stage where I'm questioning what I thought I knew about experimental helis is all haha


As far as the seat weight of the R-22, I do understand that the weight limit per seat is 240lbs, but Robinson lists the total pilot and passenger weight with standard fuel at 389lbs which only leaves about 154lbs of instructor after my generous 235lbs haha while I'm not saying it couldn't be done, but I believe that's the reason the Robinson operators prefer not to train me in the 22
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#17
Casey,

To be able to fly a 285 you must have a valid and current fixed wing certification but you need enough helicopter instruction to, preferably to the point of solo write-off, to fly it and not have your name in the obituary section of the newspaper the next day.

Michael
XE 285  1205 (Myrtle)
Start: 8/1/2013
Finish: 5/24/2014
Arrived home: 10/11/2014

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#18
(07-06-2018, 03:13 AM)FlyGuy Wrote: Casey,

To be able to fly a 285 you must have a valid and current fixed wing certification but you need enough helicopter instruction to, preferably to the point of solo write-off, to fly it and not have your name in the obituary section of the newspaper the next day.

Michael

So are you saying that I HAVE to have a fixed wing license? Because I'm now in the process of getting my PPL-H, if I fly an XE285 with only a PPL-H, will I get pulled over by the sky-cops and hauled to pilot prison?

(The above post has been over dramaticised for no particular reason)
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#19
No, I am saying that it is not necessary to have a PPL-H, that is the best way but for folks that already have a PPL-fixed-wing they can fly as long as they have enough heli instruction to show competency. Here is some information I found:

Do you need a helicopter license to fly a mosquito ultralight experimental helicopter?

For example, no pilots' license is required in the USA when it comes to the Mosquito XEL, but you need a private fixed wing license to fly the Mosquito XE. In Canada, a private helicopter licence is required for the Mosquito. Most ultralight helicopter owners decided to buy it for recreational flight.

Sorry I was not clear in my explanation.

Michael
XE 285  1205 (Myrtle)
Start: 8/1/2013
Finish: 5/24/2014
Arrived home: 10/11/2014

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#20
(07-06-2018, 01:06 PM)FlyGuy Wrote: No, I am saying that it is not necessary to have a PPL-H, that is the best way but for folks that already have a PPL-fixed-wing they can fly as long as they have enough heli instruction to show competency. Here is some information I found:

Do you need a helicopter license to fly a mosquito ultralight experimental helicopter?

For example, no pilots' license is required in the USA when it comes to the Mosquito XEL, but you need a private fixed wing license to fly the Mosquito XE. In Canada, a private helicopter licence is required for the Mosquito. Most ultralight helicopter owners decided to buy it for recreational flight.

Sorry I was not clear in my explanation.

Michael


Ah! Okay yeah you were scaring me there a second haha, yeah as much as it does appeal to me to go the cheaper route and get a fixed wing with minimal helicopter training, I've decided that it would just be best to get my full helicopter ticket just to stack the deck in my favor as high as I can for flying a Mosi
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