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Newb owner of XET N315FC
#11
This XET has 60.1 TTSN btw.
I believe the builder put about 50 something on it to get it past the fly-off period. I will go double check the logbook. The last owner maybe put 3 hours on it after taking it to the factory for upgrades, and did not fly higher than 10 feet or even off-airport. He has his personal reasons for selling but reliability and airworthiness are not among them. He is not a professional pilot and has probably 5 fixed wing in his stable he needs to fly regularly.

I'm 36, bachelor, no kids, with 4 cars / 4 motorcycles (a mix of modern and vintage) in my stable in addition to the XET that need to be driven on a rotating basis, and I only work 7 miles away where I fly a company helicopter. The hours I put on some of the vintage cars and bikes are laughably minimal, even though I enjoy and care for them greatly. So I understand having something very durable yet not using it.

My goal is to fly on average 100 hours a year, or on average a full tank of Jet-A each week. I bought it to build hours.
Owner N315FC   XET built by Scott Seaner
CFI/CFII, LCDR USNR
Line pilot at Air Evac Lifeteam, AE63 Abilene, TX

YouTube/iG : RotorLyfe
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#12
Congrats! I grew up in Abilene and my mom still lives there. I live in Guam now. I'm a huge aviation geek and hope to one day get a Mosquito. For now I'm trying to finish my fixed wing ppl here in Guam. Best of luck with your new purchase!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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#13
(07-13-2018, 03:02 AM)grevis Wrote: Michael the FlyGuy, have you had heating/overheating issues with your 285 engine on those hot days?
Gary

I have only flown once in 98 degree heat and very low humidity. Temp needed to be monitored closely. I made two circuits at the airfield and by the time I hovered back to the hangar the water and cylinder temps were high but in range. I plan on changing the coolant mixture from 50/50 to close to 100% to help cooling. Also I don't like flying in air that hot because no matter how fast you go you can't cool down. I guess they call this area the high dessert for a reason!

Michael
XE 285  1205 (Myrtle)
Start: 8/1/2013
Finish: 5/24/2014
Arrived home: 10/11/2014

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#14
Mike, you could consult the factory about trying MoCool, or maybe Evans waterless coolant. The Evans is a bit more of a job to swith too after using water mix coolants though.
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#15
(07-14-2018, 06:52 PM)grevis Wrote: Mike, you could consult the factory about trying MoCool, or maybe Evans waterless coolant. The Evans is a bit more of a job to swith too after using water mix coolants though.

I am afraid I don't understand what you are trying to tell me. If you are suggesting I use 100% antifreeze that is what I am going to do. I will look into these other products you mentioned to compare to straight antifreeze. Thanks.
XE 285  1205 (Myrtle)
Start: 8/1/2013
Finish: 5/24/2014
Arrived home: 10/11/2014

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#16
If you are wanting to cool better, straight antifreeze is not the answer, straight water it is. Ethylene glycol has approximately half the specific heat of water, giving it less ability to cool your engine than a mixture or pure water alone. Antifreeze not only lowers the freezing temp, it raises the boiling point, giving you more protection up high.... but inky when mixed with water at correct ratios.  Lastly, antifreeze contains corrosion inhibitors that helps protect the coolant system throughout.

The Evans coolant contains no water, but you will need to do your own research if that is compatible with your application.

I would think the factory designed the coolant system to be adequate in all climates. Perhaps you have sone trapped air giving you issues if the performance isn't satisfactory.
Shane 
RV-6 Angle Valve G3X
Murphy Rebel 
Aero Engineer, A&P
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#17
Straight water gives better cooling than an antifreeze mix but needs a corrosion inhibiter. Thats the MoCool approach, a smaller amount of anticorrosive (non glycol) with mostly water (more like 20:1 mix).

The Evans is a different approach, totally synthetic and a boiling point of more like 190degC/375degF, but an existing system needs to be completely purged of water mix before the evans can go in. More difficult and more care needed later on someone doesnt top it up with water. And more expensive.

And of course consult factory.
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#18
Thanks for the information guys! Never too old to learn.
XE 285  1205 (Myrtle)
Start: 8/1/2013
Finish: 5/24/2014
Arrived home: 10/11/2014

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#19
Rotolyfe, how do you approach/manage the spin up delay for the turbine when practicing autorotation?
The turbine has a governor so I'm lead to believe, that keeps something turning at 6000 rpm ( I can not believe that to be engine rpm). Does that imply that you can not turn the engine down to something resembling ground idle or flight idle ?

By the way, I'm a turbine newb, have XET on order, and I've asked Dwight but he's covered up doing other important 'presidential things!'
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#20
The turbine turns at 60,000 rpm. It is geared down to 6000 rpm, which is the speed of the recip[ engines. The drive train from the 6000 rpm point is the same on all Mosquitoes, i.e., they all have the same main rotor and tail rotor rpm. The XET just has any extra transmission element. (I learned all this at Trenton, so recalling from memory, since I have a 285)
XE285 #1329 N869DJ
Start: June 2018
Done:  Sep 12, 2018  Sleepy 
AWC Issued: Sep 26, 2018  Big Grin  
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