Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
What a good day today was!
#1
Hasn't been too much activity lately so I just though I'd hop on and talk about how exciting today was! I took a make-up flight lesson since I had to miss Saturday's due to an emergency at work, and I'm finally feeling like I'm actually becoming a heli pilot! Today I was able to fly both legs of our trip from the heliport we fly from to Gulf Coast Regional where we did some training without my instructor having to take the controls to keep us from dying!  Tongue

The correlation between the throttle and the collective was kicking my butt when trying to adjust altitude. He would hand me controls and while I do just fine keeping us straight and level, I couldn't maintain altitude, I would roll on throttle and feel like I was pulling up the collective at the same time, but since I still didn't understand how far I needed to pull it up to get the effect I needed I would just end up running the RPM up too high while still losing altitude and my instructor would have to take over and get us back to 500' again haha.

But today I think I finally got the hang of how much throttle to roll as well as how far up to pull the collective to adjust my altitude so I finally felt like I was in full command over the aircraft! It was an amazing feeling!

Of course it was short lived when we got to our destination and he told me to land on the taxi-way and well...still haven't fully mastered the collective yet...I'm still making too small of changes lol, we're overshooting our landing point and I'm still grandma-walking down my power and collective trying to get into a decent glide angle haha, so I still have plenty of work ahead of me, but I was just so happy to at least keep us in the air without assistance for once  Wink
"Into the fires of forever we will fly through the heavens
With the power of the universe we stand strong together
Through the force in our power, it will soon reach the hour
For victory we ride, Fury of the Storm!" 
Reply
#2
That sounds like a great day Casey! I am envious for sure. Keep practicing safely!
Reply
#3
Manual throttle control... not a Robinson (lucky you). 300 or Enstrom?
Reply
#4
Yea, sounds like a good day. Congratulations Casey!

Michael
XE 285  1205 (Myrtle)
Start: 8/1/2013
Finish: 5/24/2014
Arrived home: 10/11/2014

Reply
#5
Thank y’all for all the kind words!

Haha ever since I was a young lad I’ve always wanted to fly helicopters and since I’ve either been too young or too poor to be able to I instead played any and all simulator software or even videos games for helicopter flight. So I knew how difficult this task would and I have to say it has been every bit as challenging as I thought it would be and now the weekend cannot get here fast enough each week for another 1 hour adventure in the skies haha

And to Kinome78, correct you are! Was too errr...let’s say “American” for a 22 and too poor for a 44 haha but luckily I found a nice little company that teaches in an Enstrom F28C, the best kept secret in the aviation world, as they call it haha. And it is so fun to fly! It’s big and super stable, I’m not up to auto rotations yet but my instructor demonstrated one to the ground for me and it just floats down to the earth so slow and smooth it was amazing haha!

And my instructor is the most awesome guy in the world as well, he’s even familiar with the Mosquito and has even had a flight in an XET before and said that anything he could do to help with my transition from Enstroms to my Mosi he would do, although granted that’s not much considering a 1 seater haha

Anyways, life is great hahaha
"Into the fires of forever we will fly through the heavens
With the power of the universe we stand strong together
Through the force in our power, it will soon reach the hour
For victory we ride, Fury of the Storm!" 
Reply
#6
Congrats on the flight lesson Casey. You'll see that with some more flight hours you won't think about control inputs. Your brain will interpret the outside horizon/flight attitude and the needed control inputs will be become basically automatic. The overloaded feeling of chasing controls will fade away. That'll leave you to complete other tasks, like navigation, and radio communication (or just a little fun and sightseeing). Keep up the good work, the end result of your training will be something to be proud of. I have to ask, out of curiosity, what do you (and kinome79) not like about the R22?
Reply
#7
(08-24-2018, 07:56 PM)Eblezien Wrote: Congrats on the flight lesson Casey.  You'll see that with some more flight hours you won't think about control inputs.  Your brain will interpret the outside horizon/flight attitude and the needed control inputs will be become basically automatic.  The overloaded feeling of chasing controls will fade away.  That'll leave you to complete other tasks, like navigation, and radio communication (or just a little fun and sightseeing).  Keep up the good work, the end result of your training will be something to be proud of.  I have to ask, out of curiosity, what do you (and kinome79) not like about the R22?

Hey thank you sir! I did, in fact, notice the more confident I felt in maintaining my altitude, the more I spent scanning the horizon and just generally enjoying being in the air, which is probably why it was such an amazing flight haha, there is just something so intoxicating of looking straight down and seeing my hand griping the collective and the ground rolling by 500' below me, so I believe you're absolutely right and simply cannot wait for my next session haha.

As far as the R22, I personally have nothing against it. It, however, does have something against me haha. I described myself as being "too American" which I meant basically that I'm on the high side of 230# lol and the poor little 22 just doesn't have the power to lift me and an American instructor at the same time(and try as I did, I never could find a petite Asian woman to teach me unfortunately  Sad ), so I had to pursue other airframes for my training, which was a shame. I actually really wanted to train in the R22 since, as the old adage goes, "if you can fly a 22, you can fly anything". It would probably be a little more helpful when it comes time to transition to my skeeter considering it's much closer in basic stats than the Enstrom.

But for now, I'll just concentrate on my studies and becoming the safest pilot as I can, then I'll tackle the transition next year when(hopefully) my Mosi is built and ready to be flown.
"Into the fires of forever we will fly through the heavens
With the power of the universe we stand strong together
Through the force in our power, it will soon reach the hour
For victory we ride, Fury of the Storm!" 
Reply
#8
Casey doe's the Enstrom you are training in have a governor like the R22? If It does ask the instructor If he would shut It off. Remember its your dime. You need to have throttle control when you climb into your XE and try to fly. ( no one to help you now). The Sweitzer 300 is known to be the closest helicopter to the mosquito, no governor. and a cyclic like the mosquito.   

Later leo….
Reply
#9
(08-24-2018, 11:34 PM)U-L- Copter Wrote: Casey doe's the Enstrom you are training in have a governor like the R22? If It does ask the instructor If he would shut It off. Remember its your dime. You need to have throttle control when you climb into your XE and try to fly. ( no one to help you now). The Sweitzer 300 is known to be the closest helicopter to the mosquito, no governor. and a cyclic like the mosquito.   

Later leo….

No sir Leo! No governor, no correlator, just straight up manual mode flying for me! 

When I set out to obtain helicopter flight training, after finding out I couldn't train in the 22, I had envisioned learning in a 269/300, but flight schools in SE Texas are rather hard to come by, and even less that actually use the 269/300 anymore. Frankly looking back on it, I'm just so surprised I found someone who actively uses Enstroms, it is a bit of a rare treat as I understand haha! I'm hoping with Sikorsky selling the design to Schweizer RSG they're not going to let the 269/300 die! The way I see things in my head is that after I get my PPL-H, my Mosi is my heli to build time, experience and confidence. With only a single seat I won't be peer pressured to do anything I'm not 100% confident to do. Then over the years I'll eventually want to move to a bigger heli...and although I'm starting to really enjoy Enstroms, it would be nice to know the 269/300's are still being supported!
"Into the fires of forever we will fly through the heavens
With the power of the universe we stand strong together
Through the force in our power, it will soon reach the hour
For victory we ride, Fury of the Storm!" 
Reply
#10
Casey

Good to here that. Good luck on your adventure. I flew for over 7 years and  when I sold my XEL two years ago I had 118 hours on my 
202. Flying a helicopter ranked as one of the greatest adventures of my life.

MXEL 1082  
leo….
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)