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West Texas XET flying
#11
It's like anything else you choose to do illegally. You stay on your own property, don't annoy anyone, and you'll probably not have an issue with the authorities. You screw up, upset your neighbors, damage something, now you're subject to scrutiny.

I had a friend who owned a 5000 acre ranch in west Texas. He flew his C-172 from his private strip around the ranch, no annual, no medical, no current registration. His choice, and he gets away with it. I wouldn't fly with him, tho.

For the record, I can pass a ramp check. I've met a few Mosquito drivers who could not.
XE285 #1329 N869DJ
Start: June 2018
Done:  Sep 12, 2018  Sleepy 
AWC Issued: Sep 26, 2018  Big Grin  
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#12
I bet there's plenty of R22's that have been picked up by farmers/ranchers around the world for next to nothing when their 12 year is due, then just keep flying.
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#13
(10-22-2018, 06:51 PM)grevis Wrote: I bet there's plenty of R22's that have been picked up by farmers/ranchers around the world for next to nothing when their 12 year is due, then just keep flying.

Well correct me if I’m wrong here, but I was under the impression that in the Private world, not the commercial world, but in the private world the TBOs are not law, provided you still pass your annual condition inspection, if you want to keep flying past 12 yr/2200hr you’re legally able to do so...it’s  just not a great idea...at least in the private world...now once you enter commercial all bets are off...or am I misinformed again?
"Into the fires of forever we will fly through the heavens
With the power of the universe we stand strong together
Through the force in our power, it will soon reach the hour
For victory we ride, Fury of the Storm!" 
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#14
Section 3.300 Airworthiness Limitations of the R22 maintenance manual is FAA secondary legislation:
“The Airworthiness Limitations Section is FAA approved and specifies inspections and other maintenance required under 14 CFR §§ 43.16 and 91.403, unless an alternative program has been FAA approved.”

So unless some R22 owner is willing to argue the constitutional point that his property or other rights are thereby infringed when minding his own business on his own land, the service life limits in that section are mandatory.

I’m not saying that it is wise to ignore those limits, and I do agree that we don’t own airspace above our land. But even that’s not black and white - what about flying in a hangar? B D Maule used to do it until he got a bit too close to the door soffit one day... Smile
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